Trent River Crossing (Campbellford Bridge) and Surrounding Road Network

Share Trent River Crossing (Campbellford Bridge) and Surrounding Road Network on Facebook Share Trent River Crossing (Campbellford Bridge) and Surrounding Road Network on Twitter Share Trent River Crossing (Campbellford Bridge) and Surrounding Road Network on Linkedin Email Trent River Crossing (Campbellford Bridge) and Surrounding Road Network link

Project background: A new crossing for a growing community

In 2017, Northumberland County received approval from the Minster of the Environment, Conservation and Parks to proceed with the design and construction of a second Trent River crossing in Campbellford in the Municipality of Trent Hills. As part of this project, improvements will be made to the surrounding road network.

A Schedule ‘C’ Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (EA) was completed for the project, which included numerous studies from pre-2008 until 2016. The preferred alternative, based on the approved EA, calls for the construction of a new bridge connecting Second Street on the east side of the river to Alma Street on the west side. The new bridge will help alleviate congestion on the existing bridge and provide a safe crossing for cars, pedestrians, and cyclists.

The Trent River Crossing is a generational project for the community, respecting the importance of the history and heritage of the Trent River and surrounding community. It is a community-driven process with residents providing input on the options and opportunities for improvements for the new bridge and the connecting road network, helping shaping the design for vibrant gathering places and enhancing community connections.

Project details

The new 188-meter bridge and surrounding road network designs will include:

  • Two road lanes
  • Pedestrian sidewalks & bicycle lanes
  • Five spans & four piers
  • A roundabout at the Grand Road/Alma Street intersection
  • A pathway between the roundabout at the Grand Road/Alma Street intersection and the Trent River to allow pedestrians and cyclists to pass along the Trent River and under the bridge
  • Access on the east side via Second Street with an overpass over Saskatoon Avenue
  • Additional improvements to the surrounding road network including addition of cycling lanes and intersection improvements

Project status

  • The design stage of the project was initiated in Spring 2019, which included various site investigations and studies and development of the preliminary design.
  • In the summer of 2020, a public information session was held to share the preliminary design and seek input on options and opportunities for improvements.
  • Following public input, an Addendum to the ESR was issued March 4, 2021, and notice provided, which proposed a roundabout for the approach to the bridge on the west side.
  • Detailed design, based on public and agency feedback, was presented at a second public information session on April 26 to gain further public feedback.

A more detailed project timeline can be found on the right-hand side of this page.

Get involved

Throughout the project, Northumberland County will continue to seek public input and feedback on the proposed design of the new Campbellford Bridge and surrounding road network to help inform the final design.

Join in the conversation

  • Subscribe to our email distribution list for updates about the project and opportunities to provide your feedback. Click 'subscribe' under the 'Stay Informed' box.
  • Review materials from the first round of public information sessions in 2020, as well as the second public information session in April of 2023 in teh document section to the right.

Review the detailed design

Watch a video of the proposed design plan


View an interactive map


Review the detailed design presentation

Or download an accessible PDF copy of this presentation.

Project background: A new crossing for a growing community

In 2017, Northumberland County received approval from the Minster of the Environment, Conservation and Parks to proceed with the design and construction of a second Trent River crossing in Campbellford in the Municipality of Trent Hills. As part of this project, improvements will be made to the surrounding road network.

A Schedule ‘C’ Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (EA) was completed for the project, which included numerous studies from pre-2008 until 2016. The preferred alternative, based on the approved EA, calls for the construction of a new bridge connecting Second Street on the east side of the river to Alma Street on the west side. The new bridge will help alleviate congestion on the existing bridge and provide a safe crossing for cars, pedestrians, and cyclists.

The Trent River Crossing is a generational project for the community, respecting the importance of the history and heritage of the Trent River and surrounding community. It is a community-driven process with residents providing input on the options and opportunities for improvements for the new bridge and the connecting road network, helping shaping the design for vibrant gathering places and enhancing community connections.

Project details

The new 188-meter bridge and surrounding road network designs will include:

  • Two road lanes
  • Pedestrian sidewalks & bicycle lanes
  • Five spans & four piers
  • A roundabout at the Grand Road/Alma Street intersection
  • A pathway between the roundabout at the Grand Road/Alma Street intersection and the Trent River to allow pedestrians and cyclists to pass along the Trent River and under the bridge
  • Access on the east side via Second Street with an overpass over Saskatoon Avenue
  • Additional improvements to the surrounding road network including addition of cycling lanes and intersection improvements

Project status

  • The design stage of the project was initiated in Spring 2019, which included various site investigations and studies and development of the preliminary design.
  • In the summer of 2020, a public information session was held to share the preliminary design and seek input on options and opportunities for improvements.
  • Following public input, an Addendum to the ESR was issued March 4, 2021, and notice provided, which proposed a roundabout for the approach to the bridge on the west side.
  • Detailed design, based on public and agency feedback, was presented at a second public information session on April 26 to gain further public feedback.

A more detailed project timeline can be found on the right-hand side of this page.

Get involved

Throughout the project, Northumberland County will continue to seek public input and feedback on the proposed design of the new Campbellford Bridge and surrounding road network to help inform the final design.

Join in the conversation

  • Subscribe to our email distribution list for updates about the project and opportunities to provide your feedback. Click 'subscribe' under the 'Stay Informed' box.
  • Review materials from the first round of public information sessions in 2020, as well as the second public information session in April of 2023 in teh document section to the right.

Review the detailed design

Watch a video of the proposed design plan


View an interactive map


Review the detailed design presentation

Or download an accessible PDF copy of this presentation.

Share your feedback

Share your feedback to help inform the design and construction of the new Trent River Crossing.

*Please note: These comments are public and visible to other users. The username you chose when signing up for your account will be visible under your comment. You can update this username at any time by visiting your profile settings. 

You need to be signed in to comment in this Guest Book. Click here to Sign In or Register to get involved

1. the bridge design does not meet any of the Heritage Study's 10 recommendations, especially that it be suited to a heritage neighbourhood.
2. entrances to Tim's, Can. Tire, the bridge and Alma St. will make traffic on a roundabout very stressful for everyone. It will be slower than our current bridge (which is no longer slow now that the long-requested-improvement-of-light-sequences has been implemented!!).
3. this bridge does NOT "RESPECT the importance of history and heritage of the Trent River" as you say, or it would not cut through and require removal of heritage homes. It is over the widest part of the river.
4. this was NOT A "COMMUNITY-DRIVEN process as the community's concerns" were never incorporated. The committee made decisions, listened to the community at Open Houses, but made no changes as a result.
5. a bridge of this size will bring commuter traffic through town but not into our core area for merchants, but will bring noise and air pollution as vehicles will pass closely by established homes. Heart, lung and respiratory diseases will become more prevalent in the community, a well-known fact .
6. this bridge does NOT provide "vibrant gathering places". Who wants to sit beside a busy bridge? People don't sit there now on the benches provided. It is too noisy and busy to be restful or beautiful.
7. this bridge is NOT NEEDED. It was based on population growth of 2%/year which will never happened here because we are too far from highways 7 and 401. The bridge should be further south to meet 407. Traffic studies were taken during our busiest season and over the long weekend.
8. for years, the light sequences 'could not' be changed as the elders in town would have accidents. However, now they will have to adjust to a very busy roundabout at an already very busy connector road.
9. the exit on the west side up Simpson Street will lead to a lot of traffic congestion, on a hill for large trucks and turning left onto Bridge St. going north.
10. traffic from the south on the east side will create chaos where Saskatoon joins Front St just south of the bridge.
11. bridges do NOT CREATE COMMUNITY. This one will destroy ours.

Terryk about 1 year ago

We are moving toward active and greener transportation. More people will be biking (look at increase in e-bikes). This bridge needs a separated bike lane to connect to the trail system as well. Is there currently a plan to include separated bike lanes on the new bridge? Thank you.

Heidi Schaeffer about 1 year ago

I have great concern regarding the pedestrian crossing at Second St. and Front St. With the large amount of seniors crossing at this intersection, due to the seniors apartments on the south side of Second Street. Potentially this will be a very busy intersection. Seniors with walker and wheel chairs take extra time to cross the road and I'm not sure a cross walk will insure their safety.

Jamie about 1 year ago

Your public information sessions were very well planned and executed.
My primary concern is the Simpson/Bridge St intersection. I can anticipate a great deal of congestion and difficulty with large transports, negotiating that turn.

petersd about 1 year ago

Thank you for your comment around the design of the bridge.
As we progress the detailed design in the coming months, we will take into consideration the public input we have heard on the aesthetics of the bridge to further shape design elements that respect both the history and heritage of the community and the importance of the Trent River. As well, we are in discussions with Indigenous communities to assist the project team around opportunities to include an Indigenous people’s culture perspective.

Regards, Trent River Crossing Project Team

berrys about 1 year ago

This bridge design is truly a disappointment given its prominent and beautiful location over the Trent River. I had hoped to see some creativity – a single tall pylon coupled with cable stays; perhaps two sweeping arches crisscrossing and suspending the bridge deck over the river; something a little less boring than just another purely utilitarian bridge. Residents of, and visitors to, Campbellford will be looking at this bridge for decades to come. Surely we could use something less reminiscent of Soviet industrial architecture. The design doesn’t even include a symbol that acknowledges, and pays respect to the first peoples of the area – an eagle, a bear, a medicine wheel, a dream catcher, nothing! How incredibly disappointing and boring. We can do so much better so, please, let’s give it another go.

Vari about 1 year ago

Nice bridge … except the railing. Very functional and industrial, which is ok. But consider this is a tourist destination with all those on the trent severn waterway passing under this bridge. Consider having a more artistic metal fabrication that makes the bridge a showcase. Perhaps a design contest is in order to get the community involved?

markb about 1 year ago

Thank you for your question "two lane Bridge".
Bridges in Canada are designed to last 75 years with regular maintenance and capital investment. The Campbellford Bridge was built in 1968 and therefore is expected to last another 20+ years. The new proposed Trent River Crossing was designed based on traffic studies and growth projections that looked well into the future life of the bridge and included considerations such as, respecting the history and heritage of the Trent River as well as keeping with the community.
Hope this answers your question . Regards, Northumberland County.

berrys about 1 year ago

I noticed that the plan is for a “Two Lane” bridge.
What is the anticipated lifespan of the current bridge? When will the old bridge come to its bridge lifespan end ?
It appears with added housing, increased population, potential new hospital along with the old bridge soon to be end of life. It might be wise to build a 4-lane bridge or alternate plans should be considered!
Thanks,

Agray over 1 year ago
Page last updated: 31 May 2023, 07:10 AM